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Alexis del Vecchio (1 Posts)

Medical Student Contributing Writer

University of South Carolina School of Medicine-Greenvile

Alexis originally hails from Montreal, by way of New Haven, Los Angeles, West Palm Beach and Baltimore, each of which he at one point called home. Before medical school, he worked as a professional actor, produced Christmas movies for the Hallmark Channel, and conducted theater-for-therapy workshops in South Africa and Swaziland. He has since created an acting-based curriculum to improve the communication skills of healthcare professionals, which educational research he has presented at multiple national conferences that include the ACEP and SAEM Annual Meetings. He attended Yale for his undergraduate B.A. and is presently a fourth year medical student pursuing an emergency medicine residency.




The I Do’s… and Don’ts of Medicine

Our task in donning roles of professionalism as health care providers comes hand-in-hand with all the aspects of our identity and the tolls that come with it. This is especially significant as the younger generation, consisting of more and more intersectional identities, becomes more commonplace not only in society at large but also in the health care world. However, when this ideal of professionalism is compounded by someone like me — a minority woman colored by a recurrent, pervasive backdrop of objectification for pleasure by Caucasian cultures; a female person of color who feels the need to tread carefully to succeed in a field historically dominated by men — where does it leave us?

When Patients Discriminate

For medical providers to treat all their patients justly — without discrimination and judgement — is a mindset that medical students are frequently taught to embrace throughout their medical training. What is not often discussed nor taught in medical education is the reverse situation: patient discrimination towards their medical providers.

Announcing Mosaic in Medicine: A Letter from the Editors-in-Chief

We are proud to announce the founding of Mosaic in Medicine, an online peer-reviewed publication for underrepresented voices in medicine. We founded this publication to shine a light on the issues and difficulties that we face as underrepresented individuals in medicine. Our experiences as unheard voices in medicine are all too often hidden, overlooked, or unrecognized.

A Different Perspective on Gender in Medicine

I have never felt as though my gender has affected my ability to succeed in medicine. I have never received “the short end of the stick,” and I have never felt discriminated against in any way. My medical knowledge and clinical reasoning have never been questioned because I am a woman, and no preceptor has ever doubted my career aspirations, no matter how grandiose they might seem.

Chaitali Korgaonkar Chaitali Korgaonkar (1 Posts)

Medical Student Contributing Writer

Albany Medical College

I am currently a medical student at Albany Medical College. I love listening to music, playing video games, cooking, baking, and hanging out with my cat Cinnamon in my free time. My medical interests are primarily in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology. I am originally from Connecticut, and have loved living in New England for most of my life. Hope you enjoy reading some of my pieces!